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Malware reverse engineering - All you need to know

  • deepti

  • Nov. 22, 2019, 7:25 a.m.

Among all threats, the one that keeps organizations on their toes is malware. When a system is

discovered being infected with malware, organizations want to know how it must have impacted the

system, if the threat is ongoing and what data would they have lost to malware. While these are

indeed tough questions, reverse engineering helps them tide over these challenges and gives them

the edge to take action well in time. If you too are figuring out your way to combat malware attacks,

here's what you should know about reverse engineering and our innovative offering Reverss™.

What is reverse engineering anyway?

There are tools and techniques to reverse engineer a piece of malware. It has been one of the most

popular methods of understanding how malicious programs operate and has evolved considerably

over the years. It involves disassembling, and at times, decompiling of a software program to

understand how malware attacks impact systems. Binary instructions are converted to code

mnemonics through reverse engineering to create solutions that help analysts mitigate the effects of

malware and understand the vulnerabilities within the system.

The right solutions such as Reverss™ help analysts look into critical details such as the time when a

program was created despite the frantic efforts of malware curators to leave fake trails behind.

Other details such as embedded resources used, encryption keys, and metadata details can also be

obtained through such solutions. Classic case in point? When the infamous WannaCry ransomware

cryptoworm was reverse engineered," 'kill switch' was born to track and stop its spread.

Modern reverse engineers however need to employ various tools to reverse malware code. These include:

Disassemblers - They take apart an application to produce assembly code and also use decompilers

that convert binary code into native code. What needs to be noted here is that they don't work well

for all architectures.

Debuggers - Reversers manipulate the execution of a program and control certain parts using these.

This is a crucial step in reverse engineering as it gives insights pertaining to how the program is

performing and impacting the entire network.

PE Viewers - They extract important information from executables and therefore play a key role in

reverse engineering.

Network Analyzers - They help you understand how a program interacts with other machines, the

kind of data it's trying to send and the connections it is making along the way.

Modern day challenges

As malware artists continue to demonstrate new ways of combating security measures, the

malicious programs sometimes get complex to the point that the decompiler sometimes produces

obfuscated code. Modern enterprises started relying on a closed system called as sandbox for

dynamic malware analysis but then more sophisticated programs came up that used evasion

techniques to detect sandboxes and outsmart them. The need was then felt for a solution that could

rise up to these challenges.

Reverss™ - The New Age Malware Reverse Engineering Tool

Reverss™ helps teams mitigate obfuscated malware swiftly and effectively with a bunch of features

that are truly advanced. These include:

Cognitive analytics - Quick and early detection of malware due to a central detection engine to drive

security operations towards correct threat response.

Swift reversal - Actionable insights backed by robust security libraries that track past threats and

efficiently reverse new ones.

Real-time classification - Give edge to security analysts by exposing threat behaviors that help

determine scope of threat.

Comprehensive reporting - Detailed analysis reports about why, how and when an evasion occurred

to help defend from future attacks.

Closing Thoughts

Reverse engineering plays a pivotal role in helping enterprises protect themselves from malware

attacks and is therefore an important aspect of cyber security. Reverss™ is optimized to achieve a lot

more to give businesses the security they rightfully deserve.